Homesteading for Beginners

Beginners Guide to Modern Homesteading

Homesteading is about making small steps towards self-sufficiency until you have the life you want. You do not have to give up all modern luxuries and move to a big isolated hunk of land to become a homesteader. Instead, you can start where you’re at. Even people living in a tiny apartment in the middle of the big city can become more self-sufficient by simply planting some herbs in a container. In fact, that is exactly how my homesteading journey began. Here are some simple skills I would encourage a want-to-be homesteader to practice:

Start Composting

Seedling emerging from composted soil

Composting is a great step for someone that has some space and wants to begin gardening within the next year or so. Without good compost, your crops can experience nutritional deficiencies. Composting will help you get connected to your soil and it will provide essential nutrients for your future plants. To learn how we started our composting method click here.

Learn how to Preserve Food

Knife slicing a fresh tomato

Knowing how to preserve food is an important skill to have when your backyard is bursting with vegetables. This also comes in handy when your favorite fruits and vegetables go on sale or when something is about to spoil in your refrigerator. Food preservation can include:

  • Drying
  • Salting
  • Canning
  • Pickling/Fermenting
  • Freezing

Food preservation takes practice, so don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work out the first (or second time.)

Get Familiar with Wood

Man finishing wooden butcher block

Woodworking is an important skill to have on the homestead. This skill will save you loads of cash and will allow you to build important things like gardening boxes, animal hutches, and furniture. Prior to trying out your building skills, start getting familiar with wood. Learn where to buy it, what qualities you need to look for, and what tools or skills you will need if your plan is to reuse free wood. Getting familiar with wood will save you a lot of headaches once you are ready to begin woodworking.

Investigate Protein Sources

Child standing in Free Range Rabbit Tractor

Raising some type of meat or protein is often when people begin identifying as homesteaders. While you don’t need a backyard to start raising a protein source, I do recommend you take at least 6 months to learn the ins-and-outs of your specific protein prior to purchasing. Join groups on Facebook, learn about the different breeders and suppliers in your area, head to the library and read up on their needs and common illnesses. Here is a list of “alternative” protein sources to get you started:

Infographic of livestock options for people living in apartments, HOA's, & cities

If you are just beginning your homesteading journey, know that all of these skills take time and dedication to master. Failure is part of the homesteading process. Don’t let that stop you from achieving your self-sufficient dreams!

Author: Mariah

Mariah is the founder of ModernHomestead.co. She began homesteading in 2015 and has been raising heritage breed rabbits and heirloom vegetables ever since.

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